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authorJerome Pasion <jerome.pasion@nokia.com>2012-04-17 15:24:22 +0200
committerQt by Nokia <qt-info@nokia.com>2012-04-23 12:35:19 +0200
commitbb1f411455ec0e3a446b87c24d44577e17251aef (patch)
tree034ed1497f4b7444eed24d508f91feea56f12339 /doc/src/examples
parent6fe0263b25475199808fc5633fbcacc06162af2a (diff)
Doc: Changed the title for QtQuick articles
- Removed "QML" from the title - Fixed the links to the articles - Removed extra references to QML Change-Id: I47e0871d9362be9625ada61d27123b1605d55a94 Reviewed-by: Alan Alpert <alan.alpert@nokia.com>
Diffstat (limited to 'doc/src/examples')
-rw-r--r--doc/src/examples/advtutorial.qdoc18
-rw-r--r--doc/src/examples/example-slideswitch.qdoc2
-rw-r--r--doc/src/examples/tutorial.qdoc2
3 files changed, 11 insertions, 11 deletions
diff --git a/doc/src/examples/advtutorial.qdoc b/doc/src/examples/advtutorial.qdoc
index bbb145cd40..4b4f5622ea 100644
--- a/doc/src/examples/advtutorial.qdoc
+++ b/doc/src/examples/advtutorial.qdoc
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@
This tutorial walks step-by-step through the creation of a full application using QML.
It assumes that you already know the basics of QML (for example, from reading the
-\l{QML Tutorial}{simple tutorial}).
+\l{QML Tutorial}{simple tutorial}).
In this tutorial we write a game, \e {Same Game}, based on the Same Game application
included in the declarative \c examples directory, which looks like this:
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ included in the declarative \c examples directory, which looks like this:
\image declarative-samegame.png
We will cover concepts for producing a fully functioning application, including
-JavaScript integration, using QML \l{State}{States} and \l{Behavior}{Behaviors} to
+JavaScript integration, using QML \l{State}{States} and \l{Behavior}{Behaviors} to
manage components and enhance your interface, and storing persistent application data.
An understanding of JavaScript is helpful to understand parts of this tutorial, but if you don't
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ This means that when we dynamically create and resize the block items
later on in the tutorial, the image will be scaled automatically to the
correct size.
-Notice the relative path for the Image element's \c source property.
+Notice the relative path for the Image element's \c source property.
This path is relative to the location of the file that contains the \l Image element.
Alternatively, you could set the Image source to an absolute file path or a URL
that contains an image.
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@ Now that we've written some basic elements, let's start writing the game.
The first task is to generate the game blocks. Each time the New Game button
is clicked, the game canvas is populated with a new, random set of
blocks. Since we need to dynamically generate new blocks for each new game,
-we cannot use \l Repeater to define the blocks. Instead, we will
+we cannot use \l Repeater to define the blocks. Instead, we will
create the blocks in JavaScript.
Here is the JavaScript code for generating the blocks, contained in a new
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ the JavaScript file as a \l{Modules#QML Modules}{module}:
\snippet declarative/tutorials/samegame/samegame2/samegame.qml 2
This allows us to refer to any functions within \c samegame.js using "SameGame"
-as a prefix: for example, \c SameGame.startNewGame() or \c SameGame.createBlock().
+as a prefix: for example, \c SameGame.startNewGame() or \c SameGame.createBlock().
This means we can now connect the New Game button's \c onClicked handler to the \c startNewGame()
function, like this:
@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ To do this, we have added the following functions to \c samegame.js:
\li \c{floodMoveCheck(xIdx, yIdx, type)}
\endlist
-As this is a tutorial about QML, not game design, we will only discuss \c handleClick() and \c victoryCheck() below since they interface directly with the QML elements. Note that although the game logic here is written in JavaScript, it could have been written in C++ and then exposed to QML.
+As this is a tutorial about QML, not game design, we will only discuss \c handleClick() and \c victoryCheck() below since they interface directly with the QML elements. Note that although the game logic here is written in JavaScript, it could have been written in C++ and then exposed to QML.
\section3 Enabling mouse click interaction
@@ -345,7 +345,7 @@ element in \c BoomBlock.qml:
Note the \c{opacity: 0} which means the block is transparent when it is first created. We could set the opacity
in \c samegame.js when we create and destroy the blocks,
-but instead we'll use \l{QML States}{states}, since this is useful for the next animation we're going to add.
+but instead we'll use \l{States}{states}, since this is useful for the next animation we're going to add.
Initially, we add these States to the root element of \c{BoomBlock.qml}:
\code
property bool dying: false
@@ -410,7 +410,7 @@ Now the dialog can be used in \c samegame.qml:
\snippet declarative/tutorials/samegame/samegame4/samegame.qml 0
-When the dialog emits the \c closed signal, we call the new \c saveHighScore() function in \c samegame.js, which stores the high score locally in an SQL database and also send the score to an online database if possible.
+When the dialog emits the \c closed signal, we call the new \c saveHighScore() function in \c samegame.js, which stores the high score locally in an SQL database and also send the score to an online database if possible.
The \c nameInputDialog is activated in the \c victoryCheck() function in \c samegame.js:
@@ -461,7 +461,7 @@ By following this tutorial you've seen how you can write a fully functional appl
\list
\li Build your application with \l {{QML Elements}}{QML elements}
\li Add application logic \l{JavaScript Expressions in QML}{with JavaScript code}
-\li Add animations with \l {Behavior}{Behaviors} and \l{QML States}{states}
+\li Add animations with \l {Behavior}{Behaviors} and \l{States}{states}
\li Store persistent application data using, for example, the \l{Offline Storage API} or \l XMLHttpRequest
\endlist
diff --git a/doc/src/examples/example-slideswitch.qdoc b/doc/src/examples/example-slideswitch.qdoc
index 25e81861b7..259d0abeed 100644
--- a/doc/src/examples/example-slideswitch.qdoc
+++ b/doc/src/examples/example-slideswitch.qdoc
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ We define the two states of the switch:
\li In the \e off state the knob is on the left (\c x position is 1) and the \c on property is \c false.
\endlist
-For more information on states see \l{qmlstates}{QML States}.
+For more information on states see \l{States}.
\section2 Functions
diff --git a/doc/src/examples/tutorial.qdoc b/doc/src/examples/tutorial.qdoc
index 558b5bb6d9..b42384245e 100644
--- a/doc/src/examples/tutorial.qdoc
+++ b/doc/src/examples/tutorial.qdoc
@@ -228,5 +228,5 @@ This is equivalent to writing the two transitions separately.
The \l ParallelAnimation element makes sure that the two types of animations (number and color) start at the same time.
We could also run them one after the other by using \l SequentialAnimation instead.
-For more details on states and transitions, see \l {QML States} and the \l{declarative/animation/states}{states and transitions example}.
+For more details on states and transitions, see \l {States} and the \l{declarative/animation/states}{states and transitions example}.
*/