summaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/src/doc
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
authoraavit <eirik.aavitsland@digia.com>2013-05-15 11:50:51 +0200
committerGunnar Sletta <gunnar.sletta@digia.com>2013-05-16 12:03:19 +0300
commit45517fab9cd8807acd84fcd99075fa9c2a8a7f12 (patch)
tree8d7022442b878550b8d090236afcebecd274ea8d /src/doc
parentbf3433bebc3be50fe39eb67feab42bc838432d40 (diff)
Doc: Simplify structure of install doc, and some improvements
Change-Id: I446aea3950f8ef610cb91a47a3b715262c2338ec Reviewed-by: Gunnar Sletta <gunnar.sletta@digia.com>
Diffstat (limited to 'src/doc')
-rw-r--r--src/doc/src/b2qt.qdoc427
1 files changed, 235 insertions, 192 deletions
diff --git a/src/doc/src/b2qt.qdoc b/src/doc/src/b2qt.qdoc
index a787c4d..633f83e 100644
--- a/src/doc/src/b2qt.qdoc
+++ b/src/doc/src/b2qt.qdoc
@@ -18,17 +18,22 @@
/*!
\contentspage{index.html}{Boot to Qt}
\page index.html
- \nextpage b2qt-getting-started.html
+ \nextpage b2qt-installation-guide.html
\title Boot to Qt Introduction
+ \e{\b{IMPORTANT:} Make sure to follow the \l{Installation Guide}
+ closely!}
+
+ \section1 Contents
\list
- \li \b {\l{Getting Started with Boot to Qt}}
+ \li \b {\l{Installation Guide}}
\list
- \li \l{Installation}
- \li \l{Preparing for Development}
- \li \l{Building and Running an Example on Hardware}
+ \li \l{Preparing Nexus 7 for Development}
+ \li \l{Preparing BeagleBoard-xM for Development}
+ \li \l{Preparing Sabre Lite i.MX 6 for Development}
\endlist
+ \li \b {\l{Building and Running an Example}}
\li \b {\l{Supported Platforms}}
\li \b {\l{Troubleshooting}}
\endlist
@@ -36,13 +41,19 @@
\section1 What is \B2Q?
- \b{\B2Q} is a light-weight UI stack for embedded linux, based on the
- \l{http://qt.digia.com/}{Qt Framework} by Digia. \B2Q places Qt on top of
- an Android kernel/baselayer and offers an elegant means of developing
- beautiful and performant embedded devices.
+ \b{\B2Q} is a light-weight UI stack for embedded systems, based on the
+ \l{http://qt.digia.com/}{Qt Framework} by Digia.
+
+ \B2Q for embedded Android places Qt on top of an Android
+ kernel/baselayer and offers an elegant means of developing
+ beautiful and performant embedded devices. It runs on top of
+ Android 4.0/4.1 baselayers and has been tested and verified on a
+ number of different hardware configurations.
- \B2Q runs on top of Android 4.0/4.1 baselayers and has been tested and
- verified on a number of different hardware configurations.
+ \B2Q SDK provides a complete software development package for
+ creating applications on embedded Android devices. It comes with
+ the Qt Creator IDE with preconfigured build targets for hardware
+ platforms as well as an \l{Emulator}{emulator}.
\section1 About Qt
@@ -77,87 +88,49 @@
of applications that can run on Android devices. For developers writing
applications for the Android ecosystem, Qt for Android is the right choice.
- \b{\B2Q} tries to strip down the Android stack to the bare minimum, relying
- only on basic Linux features. The majority of the Android stack, such as
- \e{SurfaceFlinger} or \e{DalvikVM} is not running in \B2Q, resulting in
- faster startup times, lower memory consumption and overall better
- performance.
-
-
- \section1 \B2Q SDK
-
- \B2Q SDK provides a complete software development package for
- creating applications on embedded Android devices. It comes with Qt Creator
- IDE with preconfigured build targets for hardware platforms
- as well as an \l{Emulator}{emulator}.
-*/
+ \b{\B2Q} for embedded Android tries to strip down the Android
+ stack to the bare minimum, relying only on basic Linux
+ features. The majority of the Android stack, such as
+ \e{SurfaceFlinger} or \e{DalvikVM} is not running in \B2Q,
+ resulting in faster startup times, lower memory consumption and
+ overall better performance. */
/*!
- \page b2qt-getting-started.html
- \title Getting Started with Boot to Qt
+ \page b2qt-installation-guide.html
+ \title Installation Guide
\previouspage index.html
- \nextpage b2qt-installation.html
-
- \B2Q SDK provides you all the tools to start developing embedded
- linux devices using Qt and Qt Quick.
-
- \B2Q runs on top of Android 4.0/4.1 baselayers. For the technology
- preview release, following devices are in focus and tested to
- work:
-
- \list
- \li \l{http://www.google.com/nexus/7/specs/}{Google Nexus 7}
- \li \l{http://beagleboard.org/hardware-xM}{BeagleBoard-xM}
- \li \l{http://boundarydevices.com/products/sabre-lite-imx6-sbc/}{Boundary Devices i.MX 6}
- \endlist
-
- In addition, \B2Q comes with an emulator to help you test your
- applications without deploying to hardware.
+ \nextpage b2qt-building-and-running.html
+ \e{IMPORTANT: The \B2Q SDK requires the following installation steps to be followed closely.}
- \section1 Requirements
+ In case of problems, see the \l{Troubleshooting} information.
- \b {Target Hardware Requirements}
-
- Rough minimal requirements for running \B2Q are:
- \list
- \li 256Mb of RAM
- \li 500Mhz CPU, 1Ghz preferred for 60 FPS velvet-smooth UI
- \li OpenGL ES 2.0 support
- \li Android 4.0+ compatible hardware
- \endlist
-
-
- \b {\B2Q SDK Requirements}
-
- A 64-bit Linux system is required for \B2Q development. Instructions
- in this documentation assume Ubuntu Linux 64-bit 12.04 LTS or later.
-
- To install and use \B2Q SDK, the following things are required:
-
- \list
- \li 64-bit Linux system (for example, \l{http://www.ubuntu.com/download}{Ubuntu}).
- \li C/C++ build essentials and support for running 32-bit code.
- \li \l{https://www.virtualbox.org/}{VirtualBox} virtualization software.
- \endlist
+ \target Requirements for Development Host
+ \section1 0. Requirements for Development Host
+ A 64-bit Linux system is required to install and use \B2Q
+ SDK. Instructions in this documentation assume Ubuntu Linux 64-bit
+ 12.04 LTS or later. Other Linux distributions may work, but have
+ not been tested. C/C++ build essentials must be installed.
- \section1 Installing 32-bit Support Libraries
+ \target Installing 32-bit Support Libraries
+ \section1 1. Installing 32-bit Support Libraries
- Some of the build tools in \B2Q are 32-bit programs, and they require
- that support libraries for running 32-bit code are present in the
- system. To install the required packages in Ubuntu, use
+ Some of the build tools in \B2Q are 32-bit programs, and they
+ require that support libraries for running 32-bit code are present
+ in the system. To install the required packages in Ubuntu, use the
+ following command in a terminal:
\code
- sudo apt-get install g++-multilib:i386 ia32-libs
+ sudo apt-get install g++-multilib ia32-libs
\endcode
+ \target Installing VirtualBox
+ \section1 2. Installing VirtualBox
- \section1 Installing VirtualBox
-
- Emulator in \B2Q relies on VirtualBox virtualization software. You can
+ The emulator in \B2Q relies on VirtualBox virtualization software. You can
download it from \l{https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads} or
- install it from the command line. In Ubuntu:
+ install it from the command line with the following command:
\code
sudo apt-get install virtualbox
@@ -175,19 +148,14 @@
\li Change server address to 192.168.56.1.
\li Change both the lower and upper address bounds to 192.168.56.101.
\endlist
-*/
-/*!
- \page b2qt-installation.html
- \title Installation
- \previouspage b2qt-getting-started.html
- \nextpage b2qt-preparing-for-development.html
+ \section1 3. Installing the \B2Q SDK
- Before proceeding to install the \B2Q SDK, make sure that your development
- system meets the \l{requirements}.
+ If you have not already installed the \B2Q SDK, do it as follows.
- After downloading the \B2Q SDK binary installer, make sure it
- is executable either by
+ After downloading the \B2Q SDK binary installer (the file named
+ something like \c{Boot2QtSDK-evaluation-64bit-2013xxxxxx-offline}),
+ make sure it is executable either by
\list
\li Using \c{chmod +x <filename>} command, or
@@ -197,20 +165,35 @@
Run the installer and follow its instructions.
- After the installation has finished, continue with \l{Preparing for Development}.
-*/
+ The installer will let you select a directory where the entire,
+ self-contained \B2Q SDK will be installed. In the rest of this
+ documentation, that directory is referred to as
+ \c{<SDK_INSTALL_DIR>}. By default, it is
+ \tt{/home/\e{yourusername}/Boot2QtSDK}.
-/*!
- \page b2qt-preparing-for-development.html
- \title Preparing for Development
- \previouspage b2qt-installation.html
- \nextpage b2qt-preparing-hardware-nexus-7.html
+ \target Installing Boot to Qt on Target Devices
+ \section1 4. Install \B2Q on Target Devices
+
+ \e{If targeting only the emulator, this step may be skipped}
+
+ Before deploying and testing your Qt application on hardware, the
+ target device needs to be flashed with an image that contains the
+ \B2Q stack. These steps vary from device to device - follow the
+ instructions specific to your device:
- After installing the \B2Q SDK, the hardware devices need
- to be prepared before they can be used for application
- deployment from the Qt Creator.
+ \list
+ \li \l{Preparing Nexus 7 for Development}
+ \li \l{Preparing BeagleBoard-xM for Development}
+ \li \l{Preparing Sabre Lite i.MX 6 for Development}
+ \endlist
- \section1 Setting up Access to Development Hardware via USB
+ After preparing the device, power it up and confirm that it shows
+ a \B2Q welcome screen and/or demo. Then go on to the installation
+ steps below.
+
+ \section1 5. Setting up USB Access to Target Devices
+
+ \e{If targeting only the emulator, this step may be skipped}
On Ubuntu Linux you have to grant your development user access to
plugged in devices. This is done by creating a new \e{udev} rule
@@ -221,7 +204,9 @@
echo 'SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="18d1", TAG+="udev-acl"' | sudo tee -a /etc/udev/rules.d/70-boot2qt.rules
\endcode
- Now disconnect and reconnect the USB cable. Confirm that the
+ Now connect the running device to the development host with a USB
+ cable. (If already connected, disconnect and reconnect the USB
+ cable after running the command above). Confirm that the
connection is working by running this shell command:
\code
@@ -238,21 +223,7 @@
system log files \c{/var/log/udev} and \c{/var/log/syslog} may
provide relevant information in case of connection problems.
- \section1 Preparing Hardware for Running \B2Q
-
- Before deploying and testing your Qt application on hardware, it needs
- to be flashed with an image that contains the \B2Q stack. These steps
- vary from device to device - follow the instructions specific to
- your device:
-
- \list
- \li \l{Preparing Nexus 7 for Development}
- \li \l{Preparing BeagleBoard-xM for Development}
- \li \l{Preparing i.MX 6 for Development}
- \endlist
-
-
- \section1 Configuring a Device Kit in Qt Creator
+ \section1 6. Configuring a Device Kit in Qt Creator
After the hardware has been prepared, there is one final step required
to set up the development tools in Qt Creator for your device.
@@ -275,14 +246,14 @@
You are now ready to start developing for your device!
- See \l{Building and Running an Example on Hardware}
+ See \l{Building and Running an Example}
+
*/
/*!
\page b2qt-preparing-hardware-nexus-7.html
\title Preparing Nexus 7 for Development
- \previouspage b2qt-preparing-for-development.html
- \nextpage b2qt-preparing-hardware-beagleboard.html
+ \previouspage b2qt-installation-guide.html
When using a \l{http://www.google.com/nexus/7/specs/}{Nexus 7} as a
development device, following steps are required to prepare it for
@@ -294,20 +265,18 @@
This procedure can be done directly from the device UI, and needs to be
done only once.
- First, go to \b{Settings > Developer Options}, tap the \b{Build Number}
- entry seven times. You should see a message \e{"You are now a developer!"}
- displayed.
-
- In \b{Developer Options}, also enable \b{USB Debugging}.
-
- \note When running Android 4.2: If you don't see \b{Developer Options}
- directly under \b{Settings}, go to \b{About Tablet}.
+ \list 1
+ \li Power up the device.
+ \li Open \b{Settings > Developer Options} (Note: If you don't see \b{Developer Options} directly under \b{Settings}, go to \b{About Tablet}).
+ \li Use the slider in the top right corner to enable developer mode. (Note: If you don't see a slider, instead tap the \b{Build Number} entry seven times. You should see a message \e{"You are now a developer!"} displayed.)
+ \li In \b{Developer Options}, also enable \b{USB Debugging}.
+ \endlist
Finally, connect your Nexus 7 to your computer via USB, and run
the following command:
\code
- <SDK_INSTALL_DIR>/targets/android-utils/bin/fastboot oem unlock
+ sudo <SDK_INSTALL_DIR>/targets/android-utils/bin/fastboot oem unlock
\endcode
@@ -332,9 +301,9 @@
device, use the following commands in the order they are listed:
\code
- ./android-utils/bin/fastboot flash boot nexus7/images/boot.img
- ./android-utils/bin/fastboot flash system nexus7/images/system.img
- ./android-utils/bin/fastboot flash userdata nexus7/images/data.img
+ sudo ./android-utils/bin/fastboot flash boot nexus7/images/boot.img
+ sudo ./android-utils/bin/fastboot flash system nexus7/images/system.img
+ sudo ./android-utils/bin/fastboot flash userdata nexus7/images/data.img
\endcode
Once the flashing is completed successfully, reboot the device:
@@ -377,15 +346,13 @@
\endcode
\endlist
- Next, see \l{Configuring a Device Kit in Qt Creator} for information on how
- to finish the new hardware configuration in \B2Q IDE.
+ Now make sure to complete all the steps of the \l{Installation Guide}.
*/
/*!
\page b2qt-preparing-hardware-beagleboard.html
\title Preparing BeagleBoard-xM for Development
- \previouspage b2qt-preparing-hardware-nexus-7.html
- \nextpage b2qt-preparing-hardware-imx6.html
+ \previouspage b2qt-installation-guide.html
When using a \l{http://beagleboard.org/hardware-xM}{BeagleBoard-xM} as a
development device, following steps are required to prepare it for
@@ -395,32 +362,37 @@
every time after updating the \B2Q SDK.}
The image containing \B2Q stack for BeagleBoard-xM is included in the SDK,
- ready to be copied to an SD card.
+ ready to be copied to a micro-SD card.
+
+ \section1 Preparing a micro-SD card
+
+ A micro-SD card of at least 2GB capacity is needed.
- Write the image to an SD card with at least 2GB capacity. To do
- so, plug in the SD card/reader in the PC and use the following
- command to find out its device name (i.e. \c{/dev/XXX}, where
- \c{XXX} typically is \c{sdb}):
+ Plug the micro-SD card/reader into the development host PC and use
+ the following command to find out its device path
+ (i.e. \c{/dev/XXX}, where \c{XXX} typically is \c{sdb}):
\code
df -h
\endcode
- Alternatively, if the SD card is unformatted, run the following
+ Alternatively, if the micro-SD card is unformatted, run the following
command immediately after inserting the card to see its device
- name:
+ path:
\code
dmesg | tail
\endcode
- Next, make sure the SD card is not mounted:
+ Now make sure the micro-SD card is not mounted:
\code
umount /dev/XXX
\endcode
- Finally, write the image to the SD card:
+ \section1 Installing the \B2Q image
+
+ Write the image to the micro-SD card:
\code
cd <SDK_INSTALL_DIR>
@@ -430,27 +402,68 @@
\warning \b{Make very sure you select the right device. Selecting the wrong
one can result in a wiped hard drive}.
- Next, see \l{Configuring a Device Kit in Qt Creator} for information on how
- to finish the new hardware configuration in \B2Q IDE.
+ Now make sure to complete all the steps of the \l{Installation Guide}.
*/
/*!
\page b2qt-preparing-hardware-imx6.html
- \title Preparing i.MX 6 for Development
- \previouspage b2qt-preparing-hardware-beagleboard.html
- \nextpage b2qt-building-and-running-on-hw.html
+ \title Preparing Sabre Lite i.MX 6 for Development
+ \previouspage b2qt-installation-guide.html
- When using a \l{http://boundarydevices.com/products/sabre-lite-imx6-sbc/}{Boundary Devices i.MX 6}
- as a development device, following steps are required to prepare it for \B2Q.
+ When using a
+ \l{http://boundarydevices.com/products/sabre-lite-imx6-sbc/}{Sabre
+ Lite i.MX 6} as a development device, following steps are required
+ to prepare it for \B2Q.
\note \b{It is important that the steps in this section are repeated
every time after updating the \B2Q SDK.}
+ \section1 Preparing a micro-SD card
+
+ A micro-SD card of at least 4GB capacity is needed.
+
+ Plug the micro-SD card/reader into the development host PC and use
+ the following command to find out its device path
+ (i.e. \c{/dev/XXX}, where \c{XXX} typically is \c{sdb}):
+
+ \code
+ df -h
+ \endcode
+
+ Alternatively, if the micro-SD card is unformatted, run the following
+ command immediately after inserting the card to see its device
+ path:
+
+ \code
+ dmesg | tail
+ \endcode
+
+ Next, make sure the micro-SD card is not mounted:
+
+ \code
+ umount /dev/XXX
+ \endcode
+
+ \section1 Installing the Android image
+
Download the package \e{r13.4.1-nitrogen-20130407.tar.gz} from
- \l{http://boundarydevices.com/i-mx6-images-for-branch-r13-4-1/}{i.MX6 images for branch r13.4-1}
+ \l{http://boundarydevices.com/i-mx6-images-for-branch-r13-4-1/}{i.MX6
+ images for branch r13.4-1}. This requires registration.
+
+ Follow the instructions on the Boundary Devices web site to create
+ an SD card containing the downloaded image. We recommend choosing
+ the "Tar-ball installation" procedure, as it is much
+ quicker. However, in case of problems, the "binary image
+ installation" procedure is more failsafe.
- Follow the instructions on the Boundary Devices web site to create an SD card containing
- the downloaded image.
+ In either case, make sure to replace the device path
+ (\c{"/dev/sdc"}) with the micro-SD card's device path that
+ was found in the previous step.
+
+ \warning \b{Make very sure you select the right device. Selecting the wrong
+ one can result in a wiped hard drive.}
+
+ \section1 Installing the \B2Q image
Make sure you have the required tools installed in your development machine:
@@ -458,32 +471,47 @@
sudo apt-get install u-boot-tools
\endcode
- Then, upgrade the SD Card with \B2Q:
+ Then, upgrade the micro-SD Card with \B2Q:
\code
<SDK_INSTALL_DIR>/targets/android-utils/bin/deploy_to_iMX6 /dev/XXX
\endcode
- where \c{XXX} is the device for your SD card, typically \c{sdb}.
-
\warning \b{Make very sure you select the right device. Selecting the wrong
- one can result in a wiped hard drive.}
+ one can result in a wiped hard drive}.
- Next, see \l{Configuring a Device Kit in Qt Creator} for information on how
- to finish the new hardware configuration in \B2Q IDE.
+ \section1 Upgrading the bootloader
+
+ Now plug the micro-SD card into the board and power it up. If
+ booting stops with the error message
+ \code
+ 6x_bootscript not found
+ \endcode
+
+ check U-Boot version number. It should start with \c{2012} or
+ \c{2013}. If it is \c{2009.xx}, an upgrade of the bootloader is
+ required. See information and instructions here:
+
+ \list
+ \li \l http://boundarydevices.com/6q_bootscript/
+ \li \l http://boundarydevices.com/switching-u-boot-versions-on-i-mx6/
+ \endlist
+
+ Now make sure to complete all the steps of the \l{Installation Guide}.
*/
/*!
- \page b2qt-building-and-running-on-hw.html
- \title Building and Running an Example on Hardware
- \previouspage b2qt-preparing-for-development.html
+ \page b2qt-building-and-running.html
+ \title Building and Running an Example
+ \previouspage b2qt-installation-guide.html
\nextpage b2qt-supported-platforms.html
- Once the installation and configuration steps for all the hardware are
- completed, it's time to test the setup.
+ Once the installation and configuration steps for the SDK and the
+ target device(s) are completed, it's time to test the setup.
- First, make sure your device is connected to the computer via USB.
+ First, make sure your device is powered up and connected to the
+ development host via USB.
Then, follow these steps to create and run a simple \l{Qt Quick}
application on the device:
@@ -491,7 +519,7 @@
\list 1
\li Open \b{File > New File or Project}, select
\b{Qt Quick 2 Application (Built-in Elements)} and click \b{Next}.
- \li In \b{Kit Selection} dialog, select all kits you created for your
+ \li In \b{Kit Selection} dialog, select the kit(s) you cloned for your
devices. You can also select the emulator kit to test running the
project in the emulator.
\li Click \b{Next} and finish the wizard.
@@ -506,36 +534,37 @@
/*!
\page b2qt-supported-platforms.html
\title Supported Platforms
- \previouspage b2qt-building-and-running-on-hw.html
+ \previouspage b2qt-building-and-running.html
\nextpage b2qt-troubleshooting.html
- \section1 Supported Hardware Platforms
+ \section1 Supported Target Devices
\B2Q can be made to run on hardware that has support for
- Android 4.0+ operating system. Additional requirements
- are as follows:
+ the Android operating system, version 4.0 or later.
+ Approximate minimal hardware requirements for running \B2Q for
+ embedded Android are:
\list
\li 256Mb of RAM
- \li 500Mhz CPU, 1Ghz preferred
+ \li 500Mhz CPU, 1Ghz preferred for 60 FPS velvet-smooth UI
\li OpenGL ES 2.0 support
+ \li Android 4.0+ compatible hardware
\endlist
- The \B2Q Technology Preview Release focuses on the following
- devices:
-
+ For the technology preview release, the following devices have
+ been used as reference and are tested to work:
\list
- \li \l{http://www.google.com/nexus/7/specs/}{Google Nexus 7} (Manufactured by ASUS)
+ \li \l{http://www.google.com/nexus/7/specs/}{Google/Asus Nexus 7}
\li \l{http://beagleboard.org/hardware-xM}{BeagleBoard-xM}
- \li \l{http://boundarydevices.com/products/sabre-lite-imx6-sbc/}{Boundary Devices i.MX 6}
+ \li \l{http://boundarydevices.com/products/sabre-lite-imx6-sbc/}{Freescale i.MX6 Sabre Lite board (Boundary Devices)}
\endlist
- See also \l{Preparing Hardware for Running Boot to Qt}.
-
\section1 Supported Development Environment
- The development environment supported in \B2Q Technology Preview release
- is Ubuntu Linux 64-bit (12.04 LTS or 12.10).
+ The development environment supported in \B2Q Technology Preview
+ release is Ubuntu Linux 64-bit (12.04 LTS or 12.10). See the
+ \l{Requirements for Development Host}.
+
*/
/*!
@@ -545,12 +574,7 @@
\section1 General Issues
- \b {Problems launching/running applications on hardware after updating \B2Q SDK}
-
- Remember to repeat the process of updating also your device with the latest
- version of \B2Q. See \l{Preparing Hardware for Running Boot to Qt}.
-
- \b {Problems deploying/launching the application in Qt Creator}
+ \section2 I have a problem deploying/launching the application in Qt Creator
Check if the device is properly connected to the PC via USB.
See \l{Connectivity Issues}.
@@ -562,7 +586,12 @@
run configuration, click on \b{Projects > Build & Run}, and click
\b{Run} on the active device kit.
- \b{How do I restore my Nexus 7 to factory settings?}
+ \section2 I have a problem launching or running applications on hardware after updating \B2Q SDK
+
+ Remember to repeat the process of updating also your device with the latest
+ version of \B2Q. See \l{Installing Boot to Qt on Target Devices}.
+
+ \section2 How do I restore my Nexus 7 to factory settings?
Goto \l{https://developers.google.com/android/nexus/images} and
download the correct file for your device. Unpack it, and then
@@ -573,9 +602,12 @@
<SDK_INSTALL_DIR>/targets/android-utils/bin/fastboot reboot
\endcode
- \b{I'm unable to shut down my Nexus 7, what can I do?}
+ \section2 How do I shut down the Nexus 7?
+
+ If the \B2Q demo launcher is running, start the "Launcher
+ Settings" app, and press the "Power Off" button.
- Make sure the Nexus 7 is connected to your PC with USB, and run
+ Otherwise, make sure the Nexus 7 is connected to your PC with USB, and run
the following command in a terminal:
\code
<SDK_INSTALL_DIR>/targets/android-utils/bin/adb shell reboot -p
@@ -584,14 +616,25 @@
Alternatively, press and hold the power button for 10
seconds. This will force a reboot.
- \b{Trying to build for the emulator target fails with error message \e{make: i686-android-linux-g++: Command not found}}
+ \section2 Trying to build for the emulator target fails with error message \e{make: i686-android-linux-g++: Command not found}
You need to install proper libraries in order to run 32-bit programs in 64-bit Linux operating system.
- See \l{Requirements}.
+ See \l{Installing 32-bit Support Libraries}.
\section1 Connectivity Issues
- \b {I cannot connect to my hardware device via USB}
+ \section2 I cannot connect to my hardware device via USB
- See \l{Setting up Access to Development Hardware via USB}.
+ See \l{5. Setting up USB Access to Target Devices}.
+
+ \section2 adb fails with "error: more than one device and emulator"
+
+ You have to specify which android device you want \c{adb} to talk
+ to, using adb's \c{-s <serial-number>} option. Use the following
+ command to find to see the serial number of the connected
+ devices:
+
+ \code
+ <SDK_INSTALL_DIR>/targets/android-utils/bin/adb devices
+ \endcode
*/